What's The Real Job of a Strength Coach?

Many athletes, from the weekend warrior to the certified professionals and everyone in between, are all looking for the same things—to be stronger, faster, leaner, and bulletproof!

It is the job of your strength coach to increase all areas of athleticism while decreasing your chance of injury, amidst other responsibilities that include:

ASSESSING THE ATHLETE

There are many assessing systems out there: FMS, Cressey’s Assess and Correct, and Poliquin Performance Structural Balance are just a few that come to mind. The goal of assessing is to get information about the athlete, find out if something is wrong or there’s a deficiency that needs to be addressed. The assessment starts when the athlete walks in and does not stop. Assess every rep, every set, and evaluate every training session while making adjustments along the way.

KNOW THE SPORT

All sports are demanding in one way or another. The strength coach needs to understand what energy system is predominantly used for the sport and its positions. A football lineman will seldom need to do anything for more than 6 seconds, where a professional MMA fighter will need to up to (5) 5-minute rounds.

PLAN YOUR PROGRAM

The more time you have to prepare, the better. I have had fighters come to me and say, “Hey, I got 6 weeks to get ready for a fight...Can you help?” Honestly, a strength coach can only do so much without proper timeline. For example, 12-16 weeks is a realistic amount of time to make a difference for an athlete, but it really all depends on the individual and our history of training together.

Long story short, if you are looking to take your A-game to the next level, a strength coach can make a tremendous difference in your performance. 

What matters most is that you give yourself enough time to train properly, and have a coach that understands energy systems. The strength coach should then work with the head coach and design a program that’s effective in simultaneously fixing and improving you, not just giving you another beat-down workout.

Lawrence BetzComment