Keeping Your New Year's Resolution: No Excuses, Play Like A Champion

Ah, New Year’s resolutions. The pattern is sadly familiar. You’re going to make big changes in the year to come—hit the gym five days a week and stick to a really strict diet. You’ve got this! 

How many times have you made these promises to yourself on December 31st? 

Then you break. Those Freshly baked brownies are soon calling your name. Your couch looks way more appealing than hard work at the gym. These are the reasons why only eight percent of Americans achieve their New Year’s goals. 

We get it, so we're sharing some tips to help you avoid that breaking point, and make resolutions that stick so you can achieve your New Year’s goals.

THINK SMALL

Setting unrealistic goals is the best way to set yourself up for failure. Start small and make resolutions that you can keep. Instead of torturing yourself with a strict diet, focus on changing your nutritional habits and make it a lifestyle. These smaller, simpler goals are easier to achieve and you’re less likely to give up, keeping you on track and away from that “all or nothing attitude.”

It’s easy to cave in when grandmas home-baked chocolate chip cookies are fresh out of the oven, but one slip up isn’t an excuse to let yourself go. Think baby steps for now and tackle the bigger goals later; you’ve got the whole year after all!

ACTIONS VS. RESOLUTIONS

Don’t be the person who wants to lose 15 pounds. Be the one who is going to cut out bread, cheese, or alcohol from your diet and take a morning run every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Being specific or having a schedule gives us little room for excuses, because we know what we need to do and when to do it.

Get rid of that list of vague goals you made and set a specific plan of action, perhaps through a dedicated training program at the gym. Too often we find ourselves wanting something, but not taking the time to figure out the process of getting there.By breaking the goal down into step by step actions we create a structured lifestyle which can, over time, turn into habits. Once this habitual behavior is established we find it becomes a way of life and not just another far-fetched New Year’s goal.

ACCEPT YOUR MISTAKES

Chances are you will slip up on your way to becoming a better person. Goals aren’t always achieved and nobody’s perfect. If you do veer off track from your regimen, don’t take it as an excuse to give up on your whole week, take it as a learning experience then hit your regular regimen even harder.

It’s important to know that failure is a huge part of success, sometimes gaining a few pounds is what it takes to shed ten. Don’t beat yourself up over every little mishap; instead, learn from your mistakes, look for what might have caused them, then get back up and do it again.

PLAY WITH CHAMPIONS

Achieving your fitness goals is hard enough as it is, the last thing we need is someone discouraging our progress. The saying “misery loves company” is completely true. Negative energy rubs off on everything it encounters, constant put downs and negative affirmations will be sure to lead you on a path to failure.

Instead, surround yourself with positive people who are like-minded when it comes to your New Year’s resolutions. Sometimes just being around a group of great people is all you need to catch that second wind when you’re about to give up. Stick with the winners and you’ll become one yourself. 

Remember, start small at first, don’t bite off more than you can chew, make yourself a structured action plan and execute it.

Don’t beat yourself up over the slip-ups, and surround yourself with good people and positivity. Live by these simple tips and you can say you’re one of the eight percent that actually stuck to their New Year’s resolution!

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Nina PfisterComment